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In order for life to exist on the planet, liquid water must be present on its surface. Calculating the likelihood of this scenario seemed almost impossible before. It was previously assumed that terrestrial planets receive water randomly, as a result of a large ice asteroid hitting the planet's surface.
In a new study, scientists from the GLOBE Institute at Copenhagen University, Denmark, have published breakthrough results showing that water may have been present in the planetary matter even during their formation phase. According to the team's calculations, this scenario could have occurred in the case of Earth, Venus and Mars.
In the future, Johannessen and his team plan to test their hypothesis with observations that will be carried out using a new generation of space telescopes, which will provide more opportunities for observing exoplanets orbiting stars other than the Sun.

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11 hours ago, TomJo said:

In order for life to exist on the planet, liquid water must be present on its surface. Calculating the likelihood of this scenario seemed almost impossible before. It was previously assumed that terrestrial planets receive water randomly, as a result of a large ice asteroid hitting the planet's surface.
In a new study, scientists from the GLOBE Institute at Copenhagen University, Denmark, have published breakthrough results showing that water may have been present in the planetary matter even during their formation phase. According to the team's calculations, this scenario could have occurred in the case of Earth, Venus and Mars.
In the future, Johannessen and his team plan to test their hypothesis with observations that will be carried out using a new generation of space telescopes, which will provide more opportunities for observing exoplanets orbiting stars other than the Sun.

 

That's quite an assumption.  As vast as the universe is, is it really wise to assume ALL life requires water to survive?  

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My guess is that water is easier for scientists to detect. In addition, the capabilities of our technology do not allow us to check the existence of life at a great distance. Perhaps, in a few decades, the progress of technology will allow us to search for life itself, and not the conditions necessary for its formation.
In the meantime, research is based on the human knowledge base.
As I understand it, we are looking for organic life because we do not know about another.

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