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United States presidential election, 2012


Classicalfan626

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Introduction

This is a revision of the United States presidential election of 2012.

This is another revamped election, particularly in that the candidates for president have been replaced. On one side, Mitt Romney is replaced by incumbent President Alan Keyes (who wins the 2008 presidential election). On another side, President Keyes is challenged by an undetermined opponent, in place of Barack Obama, President in the current version of history.

In the current timeline or version of history, it is uncommon knowledge that the original republic of the United States of America went bankrupt following the American Civil War; following this, in 1871, President Ulysses S. Grant made a deal with the British Crown and the Rothschild bankers in London, forming the Corporation of the United States of America, under the control of the Crown and the Rothschilds. Following this scenario, President Keyes dissolves the corporation in 2009, becoming the entity’s last president, and the 19th President of the restored Republic of the United States (after Presidents George Washington to Ulysses S. Grant). By 2012, most mainstream Democrats left over from the days of the corporation are either in federal prison or dead by execution for treason. Keyes has been super-popular with the American people, especially since becoming a candidate for President in 2008, so with that in mind, the president is well on his way to being reelected by another monumental landslide.

In the November election, President Keyes defeats his undetermined opponents in an even bigger landslide than in 2008, with Keyes receiving almost 78% of the popular vote. His nearest opponent has 20.2%, for a victory margin of close to 58 percentage points. Keyes wins all 50 states by double digits as he had done in 2008; and additionally, the District of Columbia (AKA Washington, DC) is flipped in Keyes’ favor, with the president winning the district by a 9 percentage point margin. This makes the 2012 election an electoral unanimity not seen since George Washington was reelected President in 1792!

The revised election below is organized state-by-state in alphabetical order, for a total of 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

United States presidential election, 2012 (results estimated)

Alabama


Alan Keyes: 1,884,566 (83.1%)
Undetermined Opponent: 342,478 (15.1%)
Other: 40,399 (1.8%)
Total: 2,267,443

Alaska

Keyes: 265,998 (80.5%)
Undetermined: 58,119 (17.6%)
Other: 6,216 (1.9%)
Total: 330,333

Arizona

Keyes: 1,261,966 (78.8%)
Undetermined: 311,617 (19.5%)
Other: 28,219 (1.8%)
Total: 1,601,802

Arkansas

Keyes: 1,326,843 (81.9%)
Undetermined: 265,380 (16.4%)
Other: 28,366 (1.8%)
Total: 1,620,589

California

Keyes: 12,582,645 (78%)
Undetermined: 3,274,081 (20.3%)
Other: 284,358 (1.8%)
Total: 16,141,084

Colorado

Keyes: 1,567,910 (78.2%)
Undetermined: 402,872 (20.1%)
Other: 35,138 (1.8%)
Total: 2,005,920

Connecticut

Keyes: 1,543,512 (70.1%)
Undetermined: 619,574 (28.1%)
Other: 39,912 (1.8%)
Total: 2,202,998

Delaware

Keyes: 286,112 (69.4%)
Undetermined: 118,585 (28.8%)
Other: 7,425 (1.8%)
Total: 412,122

District of Columbia

Keyes: 179,523 (53.6%)
Undetermined: 149,409 (44.6%)
Other: 6,035 (1.8%)
Total: 334,967

Florida

Keyes: 5,412,647 (82.8%)
Undetermined: 1,006,556 (15.4%)
Other: 115,115 (1.8%)
Total: 6,534,318

Georgia

Keyes: 2,569,878 (84.8%)
Undetermined: 405,941 (13.4%)
Other: 54,907 (1.8%)
Total: 3,030,726

Hawaii

Keyes: 384,671 (69.2%)
Undetermined: 161,479 (29%)
Other: 10,021 (1.8%)
Total: 556,171

Idaho

Keyes: 665,523 (82.2%)
Undetermined: 129,778 (16%)
Other: 14,592 (1.8%)
Total: 809,893

Illinois

Keyes: 7,074,541 (77.3%)
Undetermined: 1,911,722 (20.9%)
Other: 167,672 (1.8%)
Total: 9,153,935

Indiana

Keyes: 2,988,293 (79.5%)
Undetermined: 703,480 (18.7%)
Other: 68,617 (1.8%)
Total: 3,760,390

Iowa

Keyes: 1,736,583 (77.1%)
Undetermined: 475,826 (21.1%)
Other: 41,179 (1.8%)
Total: 2,253,588

Kansas

Keyes: 1,339,417 (81.3%)
Undetermined: 278,022 (16.9%)
Other: 29,816 (1.8%)
Total: 1,647,255

Kentucky

Keyes: 1,823,784 (78.7%)
Undetermined: 452,971 (19.5%)
Other: 40,766 (1.8%)
Total: 2,317,521

Louisiana

Keyes: 2,288,487 (81.3%)
Undetermined: 473,476 (16.8%)
Other: 51,706 (1.8%)
Total: 2,813,669

Maine

Keyes: 693,367 (71.7%)
Undetermined: 256,469 (26.5%)
Other: 16,953 (1.8%)
Total: 966,789

Maryland

Keyes: 2,122,139 (76.2%)
Undetermined: 611,772 (22%)
Other: 50,961 (1.8%)
Total: 2,784,872

Massachusetts

Keyes: 3,380,460 (73.4%)
Undetermined: 1,141,125 (24.8%)
Other: 83,243 (1.8%)
Total: 4,604,828

Michigan

Keyes: 5,425,811 (76.1%)
Undetermined: 1,581,025 (22.2%)
Other: 127,123 (1.8%)
Total: 7,133,959

Minnesota

Keyes: 2,143,856 (62.3%)
Undetermined: 1,235,837 (35.9%)
Other: 61,621 (1.8%)
Total: 3,441,314

Mississippi

Keyes: 1,447,140 (86.1%)
Undetermined: 203,089 (12.1%)
Other: 30,590 (1.8%)
Total: 1,680,819

Missouri

Keyes: 2,953,675 (77.5%)
Undetermined: 787,643 (20.7%)
Other: 67,734 (1.8%)
Total: 3,809,052

Montana

Keyes: 514,150 (77.2%)
Undetermined: 139,742 (21%)
Other: 12,260 (1.8%)
Total: 666,152

Nebraska

Keyes: 987,010 (83.6%)
Undetermined: 173,174 (14.7%)
Other: 20,905 (1.8%)
Total: 1,181,089

Nevada

Keyes: 397,484 (77%)
Undetermined: 109,582 (21.2%)
Other: 9,053 (1.8%)
Total: 516,119

New Hampshire

Keyes: 554,721 (77.4%)
Undetermined: 148,491 (20.7%)
Other: 13,037 (1.8%)
Total: 716,249

New Jersey

Keyes: 4,435,525 (78.6%)
Undetermined: 1,107,434 (19.6%)
Other: 98,952 (1.8%)
Total: 5,641,911

New Mexico

Keyes: 635,232 (71.6%)
Undetermined: 236,530 (26.7%)
Other: 15,711 (1.8%)
Total: 887,473

New York

Keyes: 10,691,073 (76.8%)
Undetermined: 2,986,629 (21.4%)
Other: 247,875 (1.8%)
Total: 13,925,577

North Carolina

Keyes: 3,206,176 (82.6%)
Undetermined: 605,624 (15.6%)
Other: 68,230 (1.8%)
Total: 3,880,030

North Dakota

Keyes: 433,210 (78.8%)
Undetermined: 106,929 (19.4%)
Other: 9,803 (1.8%)
Total: 549,942

Ohio

Keyes: 6,186,598 (79%)
Undetermined: 1,504,715 (19.2%)
Other: 142,425 (1.8%)
Total: 7,833,738

Oklahoma

Keyes: 1,568,391 (84.9%)
Undetermined: 244,273 (13.2%)
Other: 33,951 (1.8%)
Total: 1,846,615

Oregon

Keyes: 1,230,050 (68.9%)
Undetermined: 522,611 (29.3%)
Other: 32,308 (1.8%)
Total: 1,784,969

Pennsylvania

Keyes: 6,793,631 (77.2%)
Undetermined: 1,855,058 (21.1%)
Other: 156,532 (1.8%)
Total: 8,805,221

Rhode Island

Keyes: 450,010 (59.8%)
Undetermined: 289,058 (38.4%)
Other: 13,241 (1.8%)
Total: 752,309

South Carolina

Keyes: 1,454,227 (83.3%)
Undetermined: 261,140 (15%)
Other: 30,677 (1.8%)
Total: 1,746,044

South Dakota

Keyes: 453,962 (77.5%)
Undetermined: 121,035 (20.7%)
Other: 10,779 (1.8%)
Total: 585,776

Tennessee

Keyes: 2,351,865 (80.7%)
Undetermined: 510,460 (17.5%)
Other: 53,685 (1.8%)
Total: 2,916,010

Texas

Keyes: 7,646,601 (81.8%)
Undetermined: 1,527,562 (16.3%)
Other: 169,873 (1.8%)
Total: 9,344,036

Utah

Keyes: 918,246 (84.6%)
Undetermined: 148,446 (13.7%)
Other: 19,319 (1.8%)
Total: 1,086,011

Vermont

Keyes: 274,252 (71.9%)
Undetermined: 100,567 (26.4%)
Other: 6,739 (1.8%)
Total: 381,558

Virginia

Keyes: 2,792,332 (81.4%)
Undetermined: 579,194 (16.9%)
Other: 60,395 (1.8%)
Total: 3,431,921

Washington

Keyes: 1,994,057 (68%)
Undetermined: 888,136 (30.3%)
Other: 52,070 (1.8%)
Total: 2,934,263

West Virginia

Keyes: 1,126,130 (76.9%)
Undetermined: 312,288 (21.3%)
Other: 26,487 (1.8%)
Total: 1,464,905

Wisconsin

Keyes: 2,988,334 (78%)
Undetermined: 776,670 (20.3%)
Other: 68,258 (1.8%)
Total: 3,833,262

Wyoming

Keyes: 270,276 (87.2%)
Undetermined: 34,123 (11%)
Other: 5,706 (1.8%)
Total: 310,105

United States (total)

Keyes: 125,702,890 (78%)
Undetermined: 32,647,797 (20.2%)
Other: 2,886,955 (1.8%)
Total: 161,237,642

Notes

  • I must admit I’m not sure if the corporation in current history is going to work out in the next version of history, since with the changes by way of my previous alternate history entries, the United States may very well be a more developed nation, and we might have a very different history unfolding as a result. But you never know…
  • I’ve decided to stop at this presidential election without moving on to elections following this one. With that in mind, you might be wondering, who will succeed Alan Keyes as President?
    • Until recently, I was considering Donald Trump, who was first elected President in this timeline in 2016. But as much as I still love the man and what he stands for, I now can’t help but realize that he probably would not have decided to run for President were it not for Barack Obama leading the U.S. into a regression toward socialism/communism. So I’m figuring with all I plan on putting in place: (1) a more powerful Reagan revolution with Reagan equipped with a strong Republican majority in both houses of Congress, and with Reagan in the case of the corporation resetting it in numerous ways to the way it was in 1871 (including extremely limited voter fraud); (2) the Grassroots Patriotic American Revolution beginning in the aftermath of 9/11 and the push for President George W. Bush to cater to the patriots; and (3) the Keyes era involving dissolution of the corporation and restoration of the republic; Trump does not run for President at all.
    • With Trump out of the picture, one might be thinking Vice President Joe Arpaio (previously Sheriff of Maricopa county, Arizona from 1993 to 2009), who serves both terms under President Keyes from 2009 to 2017, but since Arpaio was born in 1932 (making him 84 in 2016), he wouldn’t be a logical choice to succeed Keyes. The U.S. Presidency was always (and always will be) a tough occupation to handle, and it would be especially tough for a man well into his 80s. So Vice President Arpaio decides to retire with President Keyes.
    • I’m figuring that would leave us with John F. Kennedy, Jr. (AKA JFK Jr., “John John”), son of the original President John F. Kennedy (1917-1963). As I’ve explained in my revised 2008 presidential election post, JFK Jr. never leaves the picture in my revised history. Here, he has either not been in a 1999 plane crash, or not been forced into hiding by the Deep State faking the plane crash. The Reagan era of the 1980s renders the Deep State severely weakened and the corporation cleared of a lot of corruption occurring between 1871 and 1981, enabling Kennedy Jr. to pursue a career in politics and rise to influence and power as U.S. Senator of New York State from 2001 to 2013. As has also been explained in the 2008 election post, Kennedy Jr. leaves the Democratic Party during his first term as Senator and becomes a Republican. Kennedy Jr. launches his run for President in 2015 and President Keyes and Vice President Arpaio endorse him. The following year, he easily wins the Republican nomination. Who will he pick as his running mate? I’m thinking Sarah Palin!
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